Operation JAWS

mothernaturenetwork:

11 startling stats about Earth’s disappearing wildlife
Our planet has lost half its creatures since 1970, a new report finds, but there’s still time to save the rest.

montereybayaquarium:

Outer space or under water? We partner with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute on “blue-water” dives in Monterey Bay, and our jellies aquarist Wyatt Patry recently observed a bloom of salps (jelly relatives).  

Have you seen jellies? Help researchers by reporting sightings to JellyWatch

(Photos: Steve Haddock)

nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 

despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 

the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures.

for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.

notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”

this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.

passion4killerwhales:

marine-musings:

passion4killerwhales:

aplacetokeepmyhead:

You cannot be serious?!?! #wtf #orcas #tragic #awful

I saw this!!! CAN ANYOME EXPLAIN THIS?!?!??? I AM FUCKING PISSED

Can I just say that I find it HIGHLY unlikely that people in Greenland kill “several thousands of orcas and belugas a year” considering the population of Greenland is only about 50,000 people.
I don’t like seeing cetaceans killed, but if you know anything about the environment of Greenland is that it’s flippin’ cold and whales and dolphins have high amounts of body fat that is good to eat if you have to survive in harsh conditions.
I can’t say for sure that’s why the animal was killed, but I am far more lenient about things like this when it is done for survival (as opposed to the Taiji dolphin drives which are completely unnecessary and I wish to see that stop immediately.)
I need to do more research about whaling in Greenland and see what exactly the whales are being used for, but PLEASE don’t spread lies and say that the people there kill several thousand animals per year when the human population of the entire country is only several thousand people :/

You know I never said they kill thousands of cetaceans every year. It’s more the picture I was wondering about.  /:-/

passion4killerwhales:

marine-musings:

passion4killerwhales:

aplacetokeepmyhead:

You cannot be serious?!?! #wtf #orcas #tragic #awful

I saw this!!! CAN ANYOME EXPLAIN THIS?!?!??? I AM FUCKING PISSED

Can I just say that I find it HIGHLY unlikely that people in Greenland kill “several thousands of orcas and belugas a year” considering the population of Greenland is only about 50,000 people.

I don’t like seeing cetaceans killed, but if you know anything about the environment of Greenland is that it’s flippin’ cold and whales and dolphins have high amounts of body fat that is good to eat if you have to survive in harsh conditions.

I can’t say for sure that’s why the animal was killed, but I am far more lenient about things like this when it is done for survival (as opposed to the Taiji dolphin drives which are completely unnecessary and I wish to see that stop immediately.)

I need to do more research about whaling in Greenland and see what exactly the whales are being used for, but PLEASE don’t spread lies and say that the people there kill several thousand animals per year when the human population of the entire country is only several thousand people :/

You know I never said they kill thousands of cetaceans every year. It’s more the picture I was wondering about. /:-/


cool-critters:

Common remora (Remora remora)

The common remora is a pelagic marine fish belonging to family Echeneidae. The common remora is different from other remoras in the family Echeneidae by the modification of its dorsal fin. The dorsal fin, which has 22 to 26 soft rays, acts as a suction cup, creating a vacuum to allow it to attach to larger marine animals, such as whales, dolphins, sharks, and sea turtles. This species can reach 86.4 cm (34.0 in) in total length, though most do not exceed 40 cm (16 in). This species does not seem to have a negative effect on its host. The host provides the remora with fast-moving water to bathe its gills, a steady flow of food, transportation, and protection. The common remora’s attachment to one host can last for up to three months. During this time, the remora can move its attachment site if it feels threatened. The common remora cannot survive in still water; it needs water flow over its gills to provide it oxygen. This remora is commonly found in warm marine waters and have been seen in the western Mediterranean and the Atlantic, as well as the North Sea.

photo credits: rling, hypescience, richard ling, divebums

pondscum-n-bubblegum:

sixpenceee:

27 years of satellite pictures turned into GIFS. 

Google created the original gifs and TIME supported the time-lapse project. NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey’s Landsat program is how the images were collected in the first place. 

I found this via UPWORTHY

It’s like watching a living organism.

…Lobsters are highly developed. They carry their young for nine months and, when left in peace, can live for more than 100 years. They recognize other individual lobsters, remember past aquaintances, and have elaborate courtship rituals. They take long seasonal journeys, often traveling for hundreds of miles. Elder lobsters help guide young lobsters across the ocean floor by holding their claws in a line that can stretch for many yards.
- Heather Moore in “Speaking up for Animals. An Anthology of Women’s Voices” by Lisa Kemmerer. (via chronicallyvegan)

ijustlovesharks:

Deep sea Ctenophore (Beroe Forskalii) - Blue planet S1E2