Operation JAWS
oceansrealm:

SHARK TRIVIA: SHARK LIVERS…Sharks have livers different from other animals. It takes up much more internal space and serves more functions than simply helping with digestion; the oil inside the liver helps sharks stay buoyant under water, it is also prized in the health care world, shark liver oil often is used as part of cancer treatments and to boost immune systems, according to WebMD, besides being used for several other remedies. 
Shark livers take up significantly more space inside their bodies than the livers of most animals. Sharks that stay close to the ocean floor tend to have smaller livers, making up about 5 percent of their body weight. Sharks that roam the open ocean have larger livers, sometimes making up 25 percent of their body weight and filling up to 90 percent of their body cavity.
Like most animals, a shark’s liver helps him with digestion and serves as an internal filter. It helps clean his blood, filtering waste, and it stores vitamins brought in through the shark’s food. It also helps convert that food into energy and stores fatty reserves to provide the shark with energy.
While digestion is an important function of a shark’s liver, it’s not the reason the liver is so big or why it’s filled with oil. 
The oil, called squalene, is lighter than the water. A shark’s body is naturally heavier than water, and he doesn’t have a swim bladder to fill with air like some other fish. The oil lightens the shark’s body, providing buoyancy so he won’t sink. Sharks must keep swimming to push water past their gills to breathe, and buoyancy is key to keeping on the go and staying off the ocean floor. Sharks use their pectoral and dorsal fins to help them change directions in the water, but without the oil, sharks would expend too much energy swimming and staying buoyant than they could replace with their food.
Oil levels vary in sharks depending on where they prefer to swim; the bigger the livers, the more oil exists to help the sharks stay buoyant. Some shark species, such as the deep sea shark and the basking shark, provide much of the oil used for medicinal purposes because they have some of the largest oily livers. … Sadly a single basking shark weighing about 2,100 pounds can provide about 550 gallons of oil.
Source: Dirk Schmidt - White Shark Interest Group

oceansrealm:

SHARK TRIVIA: SHARK LIVERS…Sharks have livers different from other animals. It takes up much more internal space and serves more functions than simply helping with digestion; the oil inside the liver helps sharks stay buoyant under water, it is also prized in the health care world, shark liver oil often is used as part of cancer treatments and to boost immune systems, according to WebMD, besides being used for several other remedies. 

Shark livers take up significantly more space inside their bodies than the livers of most animals. Sharks that stay close to the ocean floor tend to have smaller livers, making up about 5 percent of their body weight. Sharks that roam the open ocean have larger livers, sometimes making up 25 percent of their body weight and filling up to 90 percent of their body cavity.

Like most animals, a shark’s liver helps him with digestion and serves as an internal filter. It helps clean his blood, filtering waste, and it stores vitamins brought in through the shark’s food. It also helps convert that food into energy and stores fatty reserves to provide the shark with energy.

While digestion is an important function of a shark’s liver, it’s not the reason the liver is so big or why it’s filled with oil. 

The oil, called squalene, is lighter than the water. A shark’s body is naturally heavier than water, and he doesn’t have a swim bladder to fill with air like some other fish. The oil lightens the shark’s body, providing buoyancy so he won’t sink. Sharks must keep swimming to push water past their gills to breathe, and buoyancy is key to keeping on the go and staying off the ocean floor. Sharks use their pectoral and dorsal fins to help them change directions in the water, but without the oil, sharks would expend too much energy swimming and staying buoyant than they could replace with their food.

Oil levels vary in sharks depending on where they prefer to swim; the bigger the livers, the more oil exists to help the sharks stay buoyant. Some shark species, such as the deep sea shark and the basking shark, provide much of the oil used for medicinal purposes because they have some of the largest oily livers. … Sadly a single basking shark weighing about 2,100 pounds can provide about 550 gallons of oil.

Source: Dirk Schmidt - White Shark Interest Group

sixpenceee:

This 18-foot-tall female Ocean Atlas sculpture can be found off the coast of the Bahamas. It was designed artist Jason deCaires Taylor. It’s part of an underwater museum called MUSA. (Article)


trynottodrown:

some cute shark pups for you

always-tuesdays:

The majestic Dumbo Octopus (x)

(Source: dotty-literati)

nubbsgalore:

migaloo, one of only two known all white humpback whales, was photographed off the northern coast of new south wales as he made his annual migration north from antarctica. migaloo lost claim to being the only all white humpback in 2011, when an all white calf was spotted in these waters. most believe migaloo, now 35, to be the father. though often described as albino, migaloo has brown eyes and is more likely leucistic or hypopigmented. 

photos by (click pic) jenny dean, jonas liebschner and ray alley

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

rhamphotheca:

Giant Octopus Released Back Into the Wild

Velma the Pacific Giant Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) was returned back into the wild today. The Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR, typically keep their octopuses 6-9 months and release them once they outgrow their tank or show signs of getting ready to reproduce. For their specimens they depend on donations from local crabbers and fishers who accidentally catch them in their pots and nets. They’re currently on the lookout for their next resident octopus.

(via: Hatfield Marine Science Center Visitor Center)